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Porn at Buena High School in Sierra Vista, Arizona

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“Porn at Buena High School in Sierra Vista: Common Core”

by Donna Garner

9.11.13

 The following e-mail was sent to me yesterday:

 

Subject: Porn at Buena High School in Sierra Vista, Arizona

 Below is a picture and an excerpt out of the book Dreaming in Cuban  by Cristina Garcia.

 This is a 10th grade literature book that was used in my son’s class at Buena High School in Sierra Vista, Arizona. The whole class read this book out loud during class. Everyone in the class had a copy of this book.

 Notice the Buena High bar code on the cover.

 This book was recommended by Common Core Curriculum.

 

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The following excerpt is taken from page 80 (screenshot of page shown above):

 

“Dreaming in Cuban”

by Cristina Garcia

PAGE 80

 

Hugo and Felicia stripped in their room, dissolving easily into one another, and made love against the whitewashed walls. Hugo bit Felicia’s breast and left purplish bands of bruises on her upper thighs. He knelt before her in the tub and massaged black Spanish soap between her legs. He entered her repeatedly from behind.

Felicia learned what pleased him. She tied his arms above his head with their underclothing and slapping him sharply when he asked.

 ”You’re my bitch,”  Hugo said, groaning.

 In the morning he left, promising to return in the summer.

 

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9.11.13 — COMMENTS FROM DONNA GARNER:

 

Yes, Dreaming in Cuban by Cristina Garcia is indeed recommended in the Common Core Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects.  

 

Because the Common Core Standards Initiative ties teachers’ evaluations to the scores their students make on the Common Core assessments, teachers are pressured to teach the Common Core Text Exemplars and Sample Performance Tasks (Appendix B). 

 

Dreaming in Cuban is found on page 152 of this recommended list:  PAGE 152 — Garcia, Cristina.Dreaming in Cuban. New York: Random House, 1993. (1992) — From “The Languages Lost: Six Days in April”http://www.corestandards.org/assets/Appendix_B.pdf

 

Along with this information in Appendix B is a link to which teachers and students are to refer:Media Text — Portal to selected interviews with author Cristina García:

http://www.cristinagarcianovelist.com/index.php?page=selectedinterviews

 

 

By directing teachers and students to the interview with Cristina Garcia, it is easy to see that Common Core becomes basically a marketing tool to launch Cristina Garcia’s latest book – King of Cuba  –  which undoubtedly has more pornographic, raunchy, inappropriate, lascivious, prurient, and sexualized language in it.  

 

Common Core recommends that teachers teach many multicultural, politically correct books and gives teachers and students web links to authors’ sites, thus influencing students to purchase more books by these same authors.

 

With Common Core demanding that teachers teach informational text from 50% to 70% of the time, the time-honored, character-building classics will be dropped because they take large blocks of time to teach.  In their place, offensive, sexualized books such as Dreaming in Cubanwill take over students’ classrooms (and their minds). 

 

Not only are such books highly offensive to those who hold traditional values (e.g., belief in personal responsibility, self- discipline, respect for authority, self-control, a solid work ethic, respect for other people), but they also serve a purpose for those who are trying to indoctrinate this and future generations to hate America and to trash American exceptionalism.  A steady diet of portraying ethnic/racial characters always as victims and saturating these books with gutter language is bound to warp students’ minds.    

 

Please go to the following two articles to learn more:

 

The first link is to an article written  by Dana R. Casey, a high-school English teacher, who explains exactly how the Common Core Standards can warp vulnerable teenagers’ minds, setting them up to accept the next wave of anti-American sentiment.

 

8.18.13 – “A Monstrous Story for a Monstrous Curriculum: The Ugly Heart of Common Core” – by Dana R. Casey – http://dcclothesline.com/2013/08/25/a-monstrous-story-for-a-monstrous-curriculum-the-ugly-heart-of-common-core/

 

The second article is to a similar one that I wrote:  “The Perfect Plan To Destroy America: Nationalize Education” – http://educationviews.org/the-perfect-plan-to-destroy-america-nationalize-education/

 

 

Donna Garner

Wgarner1@hot.rr.com

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6 comments. Leave a Reply

  1. The truth, but only YOUR truth, right? Can’t allow any dissent: too many facts spoil your polemics.

  2. Written in response to a concerned parent who was more favorably impressed by Ms. Garner’s comments than was I:

    all me crazy, Christine, but I can’t help but note the cover, thanks to the photo provided by Donna Garner. While she wanted to be sure we all saw the tag that proves the book is property of the school district, I noticed two other things she didn’t mention.

    1) There is nothing salacious whatsoever about the cover design, photo, or content (well, at least not that I can see. Perhaps I’m missing things. If we read the book backwards, maybe there are pictures of human witches fornicating with Satan. In Cuba. Aren’t pornographic novels usually appealing to prurient interests of readers with sordid cheap titles and very suggestive cover photos? If this book were on the shelf in your local library (which it almost certainly is) or high school library (where it might be), how many students do you imagine would be draw to it by the title, the cover, or even the description of the book I found on Amazon: “Now available in a Spanish language edition from Ballantine Books.
    Here is the dreamy and bittersweet story of a family divided by politics and geography by the Cuban revolution. It is the family story of Celia del Pino, and her husband, daughter and grandchildren, from the mid-1930s to 1980. Celia’s story mirrors the magical realism of Cuba itself, a country of beauty and poverty, idealism and corruption. DREAMING IN CUBAN presents a unique vision and a haunting lamentation for a past that might have been.”

    That will really have the teens searching out this book and thumbing through the pages for the juicy parts. Not.

    2) There is a tiny excerpt from one of the most respected book reviewers in the US, Michiko Kakutani, from her review in the NY TIMES in 1992. The words on the cover are “Dazzling. . . Remarkable.”

    I took the trouble to find the original review. You can read it for yourself here: http://nyti.ms/16rjS2N (or not, and I know that for many readers of this thread, it will be “not.”)

    I will just offer one more thing – the last paragraph of Ms. Kakutani’s glowing review:

    “Fierce, visionary, and at the same time oddly beguiling and funny, “Dreaming in Cuban” is a completely original novel. It announces the debut of a writer, blessed with a poet’s ear for language, a historian’s fascination with the past and a musician’s intuitive understanding of the ebb and flow of emotion.”

    Well, I realize it’s not exactly being reviewed for K-12 appropriateness or lack thereof. But it doesn’t quite sound like the description of “smut” and “porn.” I know few people here care, but I find something deeply troubling about Ms. Garner’s repeated insistence, her revelling in the use of the word, in fact, that this novel is “porn.”

    I am 100% certain that there are books on the shelves of the library of just about any public high school and certainly in those of countless communities where high school students may still go, despite the Internet, to do research and find books for assignments, that contain passages and writing that will “shock” (or at least elicit feigned shock from) some members of this group.

    And the vast, vast majority of the books in your high school’s library were purchased long before the Common Core reared its ugly head.

    What should you do about it? (I say that with some trepidation that I might inspire some torchlight marches in a few communities, but I’ll take that chance). Are you after getting rid of all the “smut” from the local school libraries and classrooms? Or how about the public libraries where those kids sometimes wander?

    How about the local Barnes & Noble or mom ‘n’ pop bookstore? What about the fiction on the shelves at Walmart, K-Mart, or other large superstore that carries books?

    There is a lot of sleazy garbage out there. A lot of truly useless, poorly-written, moronic junk that caters to the worst and lowest instincts of the American people. Some of it is even on the fiction shelves and NOT written by political hacks.

    It was there before the Common Core. It will be there after the Common Core. It will be there no matter what Donna Garner has to say. Garbage sells. What should you do about it?

  3. RDU

    This is a grossly false representation of the CCSS. First, the CCSS do NOT recommend the book chosen by that school district. Sierra Vista made a decision to use that book. You may discuss the lack of forethought of the teachers/administrators, but it was not required, demanded, or even recommended by the CCSS. Appendix B clearly states that the list is neither a full or partial recommendation list. What it is, is a list of books that demonstrate the level of text complexity expected at that grade. Nor does the requirement of using informational text limit or replace the use of classical literature. English classes do not have to change structure, what the CCSS discuss is the use of more informational text to develop content literacy – i.e. the use of autobiographies/biographies during history class; the use of manuals and information books when teaching science). The 50%-70% informational text is not just in Language Arts, it is throughout the school day. This presentation of misguided, incorrect information is an egregious act against an attempt to actually move to a place where we produce citizens who can dream, think, innovate, and act successfully in a world… a citizenry that understands the constitution, can interpret its meaning, can make decisions about who is or is not supporting it. As a conservative, I want my children to grow up as thinking adults who can argue for a cause effectively, not using false data or misconceptions about actual fact.

  4. Tim

    Hi Donna – I was surprised by the excerpt, certainly, but I’ve never read the text, so I can’t speak to its value overall. I’m wondering, though, how a text such as this teaches students to hate America. Can you elaborate? I’d be curious to hear your argument. Thanks very much. – Tim

  5. CCFA

    RDU: Why would such a book, that includes (in 2 pages), alcohol, smoking, premarital sex, sadism, bondage, biting, threats, blood & carving & murder imagery, unmarried pregnancy, ever be chosen to be on a list of reading material as an example to demonstrate the level of text complexity expected from 15 &16 year old 10th graders? I am astounded.

  6. CCFA

    RDU: Why would such a book, as Dreaming In Cuban, that includes (all in just the 2 page excerpt above), alcohol, tobacco, premarital sex, unmarried pregnancy, biting, choking, threats, sadism, rough sex, porn, bondage, relationship cruelty & lovelessness, blood & carving & meat imagery, as well as murder, ever be included in a list of books used as examples to demonstrate the level of text complexity expected of (14 to 16 year old) 10th graders? This book was reportedly read aloud in a 10th grade literature class. I am astounded. Parental consent, at the very least, should be required before material such as I read in the excerpt, ever be made available to students by the public school system. I doubt that quality public school teachers would ever care to use such a prurient book as an example of either literary excellence or grade level competence!

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